The Detect Phase Parameters Description

Detecting a vulnerability in the Detect phase

To detect vulnerability in the Detect phase using a server's response, it is necessary either for the response to contain one of the response elements described in the response parameter or for one of the Out-of-Band DNS markers described in the oob parameter to trigger (see the detailed information about out-of-band markers below). Otherwise, it will be assumed that no vulnerabilities were found.

Markers operation logic

If the Detect phase detects a marker from any payload in the server's response, then the attack is successful, meaning that the vulnerability was successfully exploited. To see detailed information about the Detect phase operating with markers, proceed to this link.

OOB

The oob parameter checks the triggering of Out-Of-Band markers by the test request.

`oob` parameter structure

Detecting the OOB marker in the server response

If the OOB marker is detected in the server's response, then it will be assumed that the vulnerability was found in the target application.

  • If only oob is specified, at least one of the Out-of-Band markers triggering is expected.

    - oob
    
  • You can also specify the exact type of Out-of-Band marker to check for its triggering.

    At least one of the DNS_MARKER markers triggering is expected:

    - oob:
      - dns
    

Available OOB markers

Currently, there is only one Out-of-Band marker available: DNS_MARKER.

The Out-of-Band attack mechanism

The Out-of-Band (resource load) attack mechanism fully corresponds to its name. When performing the attack, the malefactor forces the server to download malicious content from the external source.

For example, when performing an OOB DNS attack, the malefactor can embed the domain name into the <img> tag as follows: <img src=http://vulnerable.example.com>.

Upon receiving the malicious request, the server resolves the domain name using DNS and addresses the resource controlled by the malefactor.

Response

This parameter checks whether the necessary elements are present in the server's response to a test request. If at least one of these elements is found, then it is assumed that a vulnerability was detected.

`response` parameter structure

  • The response should contain any marker.

      - response
    

Checking the HTTP Statuses

`HTTP Status` parameter structure

  • The response should contain a certain HTTP status.

    - response:
      - status: value
    

    Example.

    - status: 500 — the status should have the value of 500.

    - status: '5\d\d' — this regular expression covers all the 5xx statuses.

  • The response should contain any of the HTTP statuses from the list.

    - response:
      - status:
        - value 1
        - …
        - value S
    

    Example.

    The HTTP status should contain one of the following values: 500, 404, any of the 2xx statuses.

        - response:
          - status:
            - '500'
            - '404'
            - '2\d\d'
    

Checking the HTTP headers

`headers` parameter structure

  • The response headers should contain any marker.

    - response:
      - headers
    
  • The response headers should contain certain data (the value can be a regular expression).

    - response:
      - headers: value
    

    Example.
    • At least one of the HTTP headers should contain qwerty as a substring.

          - response:
            - headers: "qwerty"
      
    • This regular expression covers any header that has a numeric value.

          - response:
            - headers: '\d+'
      

  • The certain response header should contain certain data (the header_# and header_#_value can be regular expressions).

    - response:
      - headers:
        - header_1: header_1_value
        - …
        - header_N: header_N_value
    

    Example.

    The Cookie header should contain the uid=123 data. All of the headers starting with X- should not contain any data.

        - response:
          - headers: 
            - "Cookie": "uid=123"
            - 'X-': ""
    

  • The certain response headers should contain data from the specified list (the header_# and header_#_value_# can be regular expressions).

    - response:
      - headers:
        - header_1:
          - header_1_value_1
          - …
          - header_1_value_K
        - …
        - header_N: 
          - header_N_value_1
          - …
          - header_N_value_K
    

    Example.

    The Cookie header should contain one of the following data options: "test=qwerty", "uid=123". All of the headers starting with X- should not contain any data.

        - response:
          - headers: 
            - "Cookie": 
              - "uid=123"
              - "test=qwerty"
            - 'X-': ""
    

  • The Detect phase can also check whether a certain header is absent from the server's response. To do this, assign null to the certain header's value.

    - response:
      - headers:
        - header_X: null
    

Checking the Body of the HTTP Response

`body` parameter structure

  • The body of the response should contain any marker.

    - response:
      - body
    
  • The body of the response should contain certain data (the value can be a regular expression).

    - response:
      - body: value
    

    Example.

    The body of the response should contain either the STR_MARKER or the demo_string substring.

        - response:
          - body: 'STR_MARKER'
          - body: 'demo_string'
    

Checking the HTML Markup

`html` parameter structure

  • The HTML markup should contain the STR_MARKER.

    - response:
      - body:
        - html
    
  • The HTML tag in the response should contain the STR_MARKER.

    - response:
      - body:
        - html:
          - tag
    
  • The HTML tag in the response should contain certain data (the value can be a regular expression).

    - response:
      - body:
        - html:
          - tag: value
    

    Example.

    The HTML markup of the response should contain the а tag.

        - response:
          - body:
            - html:
              - tag: 'a'
    

  • The HTML tag in the response should contain any data from the specified list (the value_# can be a regular expression).

    - response:
      - body:
        - html:
          - tag: 
            - value_1
            - …
            - value_R
    

    Example.

    The HTML markup of the response should contain one of the following tags: а, img, or tr.

        - response:
          - body:
            - html:
              - tag:
                - 'a'
                - 'img'
                - 'tr'
    

  • The HTML attribute of the response should contain the STR_MARKER.

    - response:
      - body:
        - html:
          - attribute
    
  • The HTML attribute should contain certain data (the value can be a regular expression).

    - response:
      - body:
        - html:
          - attribute: value
    

    Example.

    The HTML attribute of the response should either contain abc as a substring or the calculation marker.

        - response:
          - body:
            - html:
              - attribute: '(abc|CALC_MARKER)'
    

  • The HTML attribute of the response should contain any of the data from the specified list (the value_# can be a regular expression):

    - response:
      - body:
        - html:
          - attribute: 
            - value_1
            - …
            - value_F
    

    Example.

    The HTML markup should contain one of the following attributes: src, id, or style.

        - response:
          - body:
            - html:
              - attribute:
                - 'src'
                - 'id'
                - 'style'
    

The shortened version of the attribute parameter

Instead of using the attribute parameter, you can use the shortened version — attr.

  • The HREF link of the response should contain the STR_MARKER.

    - response:
      - body:
        - html:
          - href
    
  • The HREF link of the response should contain certain data (the value can be a regular expression).

    - response:
      - body:
        - html:
          - href: value
    

    Example.

    The HREF link should contain the DNS marker.

        - response:
          - body:
            - html:
              - href: 'DNS_MARKER'
    

  • The HREF link of the response should contain any data from the specified list (the value_# can be a regular expression).

    - response:
      - body:
        - html:
          - href: 
            - value_1
            - …
            - value_J
    

    Example.

    The HREF link of the response should contain either google or cloudflare as a substring.

        - response:
          - body:
            - html:
              - href:
                - 'google'
                - 'cloudflare'
    

  • The JavaScript tokens of the response should contain the STR_MARKER.

    - response:
      - body:
        - html:
          - js
    

    JavaScript tokens

    The JavaScript token is any JavaScript code script that lies within the <script> and </script> tags.

    For example, the following script contains a token with the wlrm value:

    <body>
        <script>
            s='123'; 
            wlrm=1;
        </script>
    </body>
    
  • The JavaScript tokens of the response should contain certain data (the value can be a regular expression).

    - response:
      - body:
        - html:
          - js: value
    

    Example.

    The JavaScript token should contain the wlrm value.

        - response:
          - body:
            - html:
              - js: 'wlrm'
    

  • The JavaScript tokens of the response should contain any data from the specified list (the value_# can be a regular expression).

    - response:
      - body:
        - html:
          - js: 
            - value_1
            - …
            - value_H
    

    Example.

    The JavaScript token should contain either the wlrm or the test value.

        - response:
          - body:
            - html:
              - js:
                - 'wlrm'
                - 'test'
    

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