HTTP Parser

The implicit HTTP parser performs the annual request processing. Its name should not be specified in a point upon using filters provided by it.

The HTTP parser builds a complex data structure on the basis of the baseline request. You can use the following filters to address the elements of this data structure:

Using filters in points

Add the name of the filter in upper case to the point to use the filter in the point.

URI Filter

The URI filter refers to the absolute path to the request target. The absolute path starts with the / symbol that follows the domain or the IP address of the target.

The URI filter refers to a string value. This filter cannot refer to complex data structures (such as arrays or hash tables).

Example:

The URI_value point refers to the /login/index.php string in the GET http://example.com/login/index.php request.

Path Filter

The Path filter refers to an array containing URI path parts. The elements of this array need to be referred to by using their indexes. The array indexing starts with 0.

Regular expressions in points

The index in the point can be a regular expression of the Ruby programming language.

Example:

For the GET http://example.com/main/login/index.php HTTP/1.1 request, the Path filter refers to the following array:

Index Value
0 main
1 login
  • The PATH_0_value point refers to the main value that is located in the array addressed by the Path filter with the 0 index.
  • The PATH_1_value point refers to the login value that is located in the array addressed by the Path filter with the 1 index.

If the request URI contains only one part, the Path filter addresses the empty array.

Example:

For the GET http://example.com/ HTTP/1.1 request, the Path filter refers to an empty array.

Action_name Filter

The Action_name filter refers to the part of the URI that starts after the last / symbol and ends with the period.

The Action_name filter refers to a string value. This filter cannot refer to complex data structures (such as arrays or hash tables).

Example:

  • The ACTION_NAME_value point refers to the index value for the GET http://example.com/login/index.php request.

  • The ACTION_NAME_value point refers to the empty value for the GET http://example.com/login/ request.

Action_ext Filter

The Action_ext filter refers to the part of the URI that starts after the first period following the last / symbol. If this part of the URI is missing from the request, the Action_ext filter cannot be used in the point.

The Action_ext filter refers to a string value. This filter cannot refer to complex data structures (such as arrays or hash tables).

Example:

  • The ACTION_EXT_value point refers to the php value for the GET http://example.com/main/login/index.php request.
  • The Action_ext filter cannot be used in the point that refers the GET http://example.com/main/login/ request.

Get Filter

The Get filter refers to the hash table that contains parameters from the request query string. The elements of this hash table need to be referred to by using the names of the parameters.

Regular expressions in points

The name of the parameter in the point can be a regular expression of the Ruby programming language.

Query string parameters may also contain the following complex data structures: arrays and hash tables. Use the Array and Hash filters correspondingly to address the elements in these structures.

Example:

For the POST http://example.com/login?id=01234&username=admin request, the Get filter refers to the following hash table:

Parameter name Value
id 01234
username admin
  • The GET_id_value point refers to the 01234 value that corresponds to the id parameter from the hash table addressed by the Get filter.
  • The GET_username_value point refers to the admin value that corresponds to the username parameter from the hash table addressed by the Get filter.

Header Filter

The Header filter refers to the hash table that contains header names and values. The elements of this hash table need to be referred to by using the names of the headers.

A header name in a point

A header name can be specified in a point in one of the following ways:

  • In upper case;
  • The same way it is specified in the request.

Regular expressions in points

The header name in the point can be a regular expression of the Ruby programming language.

The name of the header can also contain an array of values. Use the Array filter to address the elements of this array.

Example:

For the

GET /login/index.php HTTP/1.1
Connection: keep-alive
Host: example.com
Accept-encoding: gzip

request, the Header filter refers to the following hash table:

Header name Value
Connection keep-alive
Host example.com
Accept-Encoding gzip
  • The HEADER_Connection_value point refers to the keep-alive value that corresponds to the Connection header from the hash table addressed by the Header filter.
  • The HEADER_Host_value point refers to the example.com value that corresponds to the Host header from the hash table addressed by the Header filter.
  • The HEADER_Accept-Encoding_value point refers to the gzip value that corresponds to the Accept-Encoding header from the hash table addressed by the Header filter.

Post Filter

The Post filter refers to the request body contents.

You can use the name of the Post filter in the point to work with the request body contents in raw format.

Example:

For the

POST http://example.com/main/index.php HTTP/1.1
Content-Type: text/plain
Content-Length: 28

request with the

This is a simple body text.

body, the POST_value point refers to the This is a simple body text. value from the request body.

You can also work with a request body that contains complex data structures. Use the following filters and parsers in the point after the Post filter to address the elements of the corresponding data structures:

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